Category: Artwork & Creative

Werewolf art timelapse – Ryan Pancoast’s “Lambholt Pacifist / Lambholt Butcher”

A. Quinton — Jul. 17th 2018

Here’s a video of Ryan Pancoast painting the art featured on the two sides of “Lambholt Pacifist / Lambholt Butcher“, a Magic: The Gathering card from 2016’s “Shadows Over Innistrad” expansion.

From what I understand of the game mechanics, which is very little (this is the most I have thought about Magic since the afternoon in 1995 when my uncle tried and failed to get me interested), this card’s two sides represent the same person. Even if you’re clueless about the game, the identical background foliage and the discarded cowl in the nighttime / werewolf image are lovely clues. Therefore what we’re seeing in the completed images are this mysterious woman’s binary states of existence: “I am cool with birds” and “I absolutely fucking hate birds”.

Both paintings are available for purchase as prints, because sometimes the Internet is good! You can see more of Ryan’s amazing paintings at his site and on his YouTube channel.

Thanks to friend of the site (and wonderful artist in his own right) Doruk Golcu for posting this video.

Figurosity gets into #Julycanthropy with “An American Werewolf in Cyberspace”

A. Quinton — Jul. 12th 2018

Figure drawing reference site Figurosity is getting into the “all werewolf art, all month long” mandate of #Julycanthropy with member David‘s collection of 66 werewolf action poses.

If you’re looking for some inspiration to snap you out of that “howling at the full moon” pose you always draw your werewolves in, this is an excellent free resource. If that’s not enough, a $2.99/month membership will let you see under this werewolf’s clothes (not like that, come on) or even under his fur and skin. Here’s a preview of some of his layers, courtesy of the Figurosity Twitter account.

There are many other models and poses on the site, too, but as my pals online say, “why not werewolves?”

WV06: Werewolves Versus Fashion

A. Quinton — Jul. 3rd 2018

After weeks of work, I’m very proud to announce that the six issue of the collaborative werewolf magazine I edit and produce is out! All 149 pages of WEREWOLVES VERSUS: FASHION are here for your enjoyment, at the low low cost of $0 (or whatever you want to pay, and since it took a lot of work and all the contributors get a slice, I entreat you to consider paying something).

This is an art-centric issue, containing over 45 hi-res images – mostly monstrous portraits and fashion pin-ups, but also a 12-page comic guest starring me as “Candace Locke, from the Bureau”. I also received a number of short stories (and one poem) that were just too good to pass up. Check out the cover, the pitch, and contributor list below. If you’re intrigued by the idea of werewolves embracing and / or literally destroying haute couture, check it out!

Everyone can look great in a tailored suit or a stunning ball gown, even when you’re eight feet tall and covered in fur, but the true value of fashion isn’t how it makes you look, it’s how it makes you feel. It can crush you with unrealistic expectations, give you the strength to carry on when things are desperate, or empower you to bite the startled head clean off the shoulders of your enemy.

Our sixth issue is a double-sized look at the claw-throat world of lycanthropic haute couture – a realm where the fabrics are dark to hide the blood, enchanted stretch materials can make you a legend, and fur is most definitely still murder (especially when it’s your own).

Featuring over 45 pieces of hi-resolution original art and over 32,000 words of werewolf fiction and poetry from these contributors:

…plus lethally stylish cover art by Ben Geldenhuys.

Vampires vs Werewolves (not Swearwolves) in Scott C.’s latest Great Showdown

A. Quinton — May. 16th 2018

After some time off to work on other things, Scott C., the single most chill artist I’ve ever met at a convention, has resumed his delightful Great Showdowns painting series (“chronicling of some of the greatest confrontations in FILM HISTORY”). This week’s entry is a face-off between two of New Zealand’s most acrimonious crews: the vampires and the werewolves from Taika Waititi’s “What We Do in the Shadows”.

http://greatshowdowns.com/post/173929940544/were-werewolves-not-swear-wolves

Scott’s art always makes me smile (much like every character and most inanimate objects in his paintings), and his Showdowns are great, even when I haven’t seen the film depicted. Werewolves do appear in some of his previous Showdowns, including Monster Squad, The Wolf Man and Teen Wolf.

Werewolves abound in these student video projects from LCAD Animation

A. Quinton — May. 2nd 2018

While updating the Laguna College of Art + Design Animation YouTube channel late last year, Chair of Animation Dave Kuhn noticed that two group projects from their 2015 Summer Master Class happened to be werewolf-themed. He writes:

The first is “The Big Dad Wolf” which is traditionally animated and was created under the mentorship of Disney supervising animator James Lopez. The second is a stop-motion project “Un Garçon et sa Bête (A Boy and his Beast)” which was made with the guidance of stop-motion director Stephen Chiodo of Chiodo Bros. Productions.

You can watch both projects below!

“The Big Dad Wolf” took me back to the slapstick delights of the Disney and Warner Bros. shorts I remember from the 1990s (when the gurney rolled into the nursery I honestly felt like I was watching Tiny Toons or Animaniacs).

“Un Garçon et sa Bête” has a creature that isn’t strictly a werewolf, but which is close enough for the purposes of all concerned, and the production features some sincerely lovely animation and character / set designs.

Visit the LCAD Animation YouTube channel for more wonderful animations. Thanks for the links, Dave!

“The Werewolf Colouring Book” is fun for lycanthropes of all ages

A. Quinton — Apr. 13th 2018

Friend of Werewolf News and WEREWOLVES VERSUS: SPACE cover artist Ben Geldenhuys has created a fantastic werewolf colouring book, and is taking pre-orders for it now!

This book contains 16 unique werewolf colouring pictures, alternating with some fun werewolf facts, making it possible to cut out the image pages without losing out on an image on the back. It is printed on high quality paper suitable to most media, including markers (just put a sheet of paper behind your page to prevent bleed through). It is not ideal for very wet media like watercolour, but handles small amounts of watercolour/aquarelle pencil fine. Two of the pictures are double page spreads.

Size: A4 (21cm x 29.7cm)

For about $10 USD + shipping from South Africa, you can get a copy for yourself. Ben’s werewolves are actual big monstrous werewolves (“proper” werewolves, I might say if I wanted to get yelled at), and I was responsible for two of the (somewhat spurious) werewolf facts contained within. Take a look at some previews below, and head over to Etsy to get your copy!

Weekly Werewolf Art: “Domini Canes” by Kosse

A. Quinton — Mar. 4th 2018

This week’s art is by Kosse, a freelance illustrator and occasional hyena from France. Despite some uncertainty in the tags and the potential contextual significance of a Neon Genesis Evangelion quote that goes over my uninitiated head, I think this fellow is a werewolf. A pious werewolf, which is one of the most dangerous kinds, as the residents of Tarker’s Mills well know. His proper posture and rosary aren’t enough to convince me that he’s got the welfare of his flock in mind.

http://overthelazydog.tumblr.com/post/165585195688/once-friends-betrayed-so-ruthless-now-dead-his

You can find Kosse on Twitter, Tumblr, FurAffinity and Ultra-book. Werewolves and other snarly canids appear frequently in his work. His great poses contrast nicely with his muted, earthy colour palettes, and he draws extremely good chompers.

Weekly Werewolf Art: Frank Cho “Werewolf Feasting” Sculptures by Rodion Vlasov & Maria Panfilova

A. Quinton — Feb. 21st 2018

Earlier this week, digital sculptors Maria Panfilova and Rodion Vlasov fired up ZBrush to stage a “friendly sculpt battle”. The goal: to see who could better interpret an illustration of a feasting werewolf by Frank Cho. The results posted on their Instagram feeds seem to clear to me: everyone wins. Literally everyone on the planet, except for the owner of that gnawed-upon arm, who has lost a different, more fundamental battle.

Maria Panfilova

Maria is a 3D character artist from Moscow. You can see more of her work, which ranges from fantasy creatures to lifelike realizations of scenes from Disney films, at ArtStation. Her interpretation of werewolf dinnertime is very animal, with an emphasis on the musculature and hunched posture. This is a creature that’s eating quickly, protecting its meal from potential attackers. The tension and the way it’s framed in the renders below makes me think of Goya’s Saturn Devouring His Son.

 

Rodion Vlasov

Rodion is a CG artist and musician from Yaroslavl. He’s also on ArtStation, and his creations are more in the fantasy-horror vein. That’s reflected in his version of Werewolf Feasting, which depicts a lycanthrope with fur that’s matted, almost tentacle-like, and a more relaxed pose, as if to say “yeah, I ate this guy, and no matter how fast you run, you’re next.” Rodion also posted two time-lapse videos of his work on this that are available on his YouTube channel.

Canfeng Chen’s Red Riding Hood werewolf design

A. Quinton — Feb. 18th 2018

I like the werewolf design in this short animation by illustrator Canfeng Chen, completed as part of some coursework he was doing in 2016. But who is this werewolf? Well, I’ve included an image of one of the other two characters in the animation as a clue.

Weekly Werewolf Art: “2018.5” by Howlitzer

A. Quinton — Feb. 13th 2018

The werewolf often appears in art as a representation of inner turmoil – animal ferocity channeled into a fight-or-flight response to an attacker metaphorical or physical. Howlitzer‘s werewolves capture this struggle without relying on the extremes of cartoonish horror or cringing animal fear. His werewolves, with their boxy muzzles, spiked pelts and black claws, are clearly deadly creatures, but as with this week’s feature, the practically-titled “2018.5“, that mortal danger is at a simmer. Preoccupied by some unknowable ennui, his werewolves seethe, always on the precipice of lashing out, seemingly struggling to maintain control, or perhaps a coherent shape.

http://werewolf-noises.tumblr.com/post/170136936368/hi

Howlitzer’s werewolves are never happy. At best, they’re contemplative, perhaps self-soothing with a bloody snack, and at worst they’re drowning in (or perhaps coalescing from) grey goo, or externalizing their divided mind with overlapping Cerberus-style heads. Whenever I see a Howlitzer werewolf, I feel like my headphones have gone silent and I’m two seconds from unmuting them with the volume accidentally cranked to ear-splitting maximum. That’s a kind of danger I like.

You can find more of Howlitzer’s work on FurAffinity, Weasyl and DeviantArt. If you’re a werewolf fan on Twitter, his account there is a mandatory follow – he’s almost singlehandedly responsible for the “werewolf shitposting” phenomenon that makes that terrible web site bearable.