Category: Artwork & Creative

Vampires vs Werewolves (not Swearwolves) in Scott C.’s latest Great Showdown

A. Quinton — May. 16th 2018

After some time off to work on other things, Scott C., the single most chill artist I’ve ever met at a convention, has resumed his delightful Great Showdowns painting series (“chronicling of some of the greatest confrontations in FILM HISTORY”). This week’s entry is a face-off between two of New Zealand’s most acrimonious crews: the vampires and the werewolves from Taika Waititi’s “What We Do in the Shadows”.

http://greatshowdowns.com/post/173929940544/were-werewolves-not-swear-wolves

Scott’s art always makes me smile (much like every character and most inanimate objects in his paintings), and his Showdowns are great, even when I haven’t seen the film depicted. Werewolves do appear in some of his previous Showdowns, including Monster Squad, The Wolf Man and Teen Wolf.

Werewolves abound in these student video projects from LCAD Animation

A. Quinton — May. 2nd 2018

While updating the Laguna College of Art + Design Animation YouTube channel late last year, Chair of Animation Dave Kuhn noticed that two group projects from their 2015 Summer Master Class happened to be werewolf-themed. He writes:

The first is “The Big Dad Wolf” which is traditionally animated and was created under the mentorship of Disney supervising animator James Lopez. The second is a stop-motion project “Un Garçon et sa Bête (A Boy and his Beast)” which was made with the guidance of stop-motion director Stephen Chiodo of Chiodo Bros. Productions.

You can watch both projects below!

“The Big Dad Wolf” took me back to the slapstick delights of the Disney and Warner Bros. shorts I remember from the 1990s (when the gurney rolled into the nursery I honestly felt like I was watching Tiny Toons or Animaniacs).

“Un Garçon et sa Bête” has a creature that isn’t strictly a werewolf, but which is close enough for the purposes of all concerned, and the production features some sincerely lovely animation and character / set designs.

Visit the LCAD Animation YouTube channel for more wonderful animations. Thanks for the links, Dave!

“The Werewolf Colouring Book” is fun for lycanthropes of all ages

A. Quinton — Apr. 13th 2018

Friend of Werewolf News and WEREWOLVES VERSUS: SPACE cover artist Ben Geldenhuys has created a fantastic werewolf colouring book, and is taking pre-orders for it now!

This book contains 16 unique werewolf colouring pictures, alternating with some fun werewolf facts, making it possible to cut out the image pages without losing out on an image on the back. It is printed on high quality paper suitable to most media, including markers (just put a sheet of paper behind your page to prevent bleed through). It is not ideal for very wet media like watercolour, but handles small amounts of watercolour/aquarelle pencil fine. Two of the pictures are double page spreads.

Size: A4 (21cm x 29.7cm)

For about $10 USD + shipping from South Africa, you can get a copy for yourself. Ben’s werewolves are actual big monstrous werewolves (“proper” werewolves, I might say if I wanted to get yelled at), and I was responsible for two of the (somewhat spurious) werewolf facts contained within. Take a look at some previews below, and head over to Etsy to get your copy!

Weekly Werewolf Art: “Domini Canes” by Kosse

A. Quinton — Mar. 4th 2018

This week’s art is by Kosse, a freelance illustrator and occasional hyena from France. Despite some uncertainty in the tags and the potential contextual significance of a Neon Genesis Evangelion quote that goes over my uninitiated head, I think this fellow is a werewolf. A pious werewolf, which is one of the most dangerous kinds, as the residents of Tarker’s Mills well know. His proper posture and rosary aren’t enough to convince me that he’s got the welfare of his flock in mind.

http://overthelazydog.tumblr.com/post/165585195688/once-friends-betrayed-so-ruthless-now-dead-his

You can find Kosse on Twitter, Tumblr, FurAffinity and Ultra-book. Werewolves and other snarly canids appear frequently in his work. His great poses contrast nicely with his muted, earthy colour palettes, and he draws extremely good chompers.

Weekly Werewolf Art: Frank Cho “Werewolf Feasting” Sculptures by Rodion Vlasov & Maria Panfilova

A. Quinton — Feb. 21st 2018

Earlier this week, digital sculptors Maria Panfilova and Rodion Vlasov fired up ZBrush to stage a “friendly sculpt battle”. The goal: to see who could better interpret an illustration of a feasting werewolf by Frank Cho. The results posted on their Instagram feeds seem to clear to me: everyone wins. Literally everyone on the planet, except for the owner of that gnawed-upon arm, who has lost a different, more fundamental battle.

Maria Panfilova

Maria is a 3D character artist from Moscow. You can see more of her work, which ranges from fantasy creatures to lifelike realizations of scenes from Disney films, at ArtStation. Her interpretation of werewolf dinnertime is very animal, with an emphasis on the musculature and hunched posture. This is a creature that’s eating quickly, protecting its meal from potential attackers. The tension and the way it’s framed in the renders below makes me think of Goya’s Saturn Devouring His Son.

 

Rodion Vlasov

Rodion is a CG artist and musician from Yaroslavl. He’s also on ArtStation, and his creations are more in the fantasy-horror vein. That’s reflected in his version of Werewolf Feasting, which depicts a lycanthrope with fur that’s matted, almost tentacle-like, and a more relaxed pose, as if to say “yeah, I ate this guy, and no matter how fast you run, you’re next.” Rodion also posted two time-lapse videos of his work on this that are available on his YouTube channel.

Canfeng Chen’s Red Riding Hood werewolf design

A. Quinton — Feb. 18th 2018

I like the werewolf design in this short animation by illustrator Canfeng Chen, completed as part of some coursework he was doing in 2016. But who is this werewolf? Well, I’ve included an image of one of the other two characters in the animation as a clue.

Weekly Werewolf Art: “2018.5” by Howlitzer

A. Quinton — Feb. 13th 2018

The werewolf often appears in art as a representation of inner turmoil – animal ferocity channeled into a fight-or-flight response to an attacker metaphorical or physical. Howlitzer‘s werewolves capture this struggle without relying on the extremes of cartoonish horror or cringing animal fear. His werewolves, with their boxy muzzles, spiked pelts and black claws, are clearly deadly creatures, but as with this week’s feature, the practically-titled “2018.5“, that mortal danger is at a simmer. Preoccupied by some unknowable ennui, his werewolves seethe, always on the precipice of lashing out, seemingly struggling to maintain control, or perhaps a coherent shape.

http://werewolf-noises.tumblr.com/post/170136936368/hi

Howlitzer’s werewolves are never happy. At best, they’re contemplative, perhaps self-soothing with a bloody snack, and at worst they’re drowning in (or perhaps coalescing from) grey goo, or externalizing their divided mind with overlapping Cerberus-style heads. Whenever I see a Howlitzer werewolf, I feel like my headphones have gone silent and I’m two seconds from unmuting them with the volume accidentally cranked to ear-splitting maximum. That’s a kind of danger I like.

You can find more of Howlitzer’s work on FurAffinity, Weasyl and DeviantArt. If you’re a werewolf fan on Twitter, his account there is a mandatory follow – he’s almost singlehandedly responsible for the “werewolf shitposting” phenomenon that makes that terrible web site bearable.

The Infection is spreading! Pre-order KingGuro’s werewolf claw pin

A. Quinton — Feb. 6th 2018

In May of year artist Kris Starlein made available a gorgeous 1.75″ enamel pin of a (mostly) human skull, ensconced in a ferocious werewolf silhouette. I purchased one as a gift for my wife, and have envied it ever since. Now Kris (who goes by KingGuro) has started accepting pre-orders for a new pin that serves as a sequel to the original one and re-contextualizes the set as an ongoing transformation.

You can pre-order “The Spread” – depicting a human hand transforming into a furred claw – for $10 USD plus shipping.

If you missed the original pin when it came out, you can snag both as “The Infected Set” for $20 USD plus shipping.

Just fill out this Google form with your choice and details and you’ll be sent a PayPal invoice when the time comes. You’ll also get updates on the pin’s manufacturing progress and shipping dates (currently estimated as mid-April). If you live outside the United States you can still place a pre-order, but be aware that you’ll pay more for shipping.

I love the design so much (and was so impressed with the quality of last year’s pin) that I’ve asked to order both options – The Spread, to complete my wife’s set, and The Infected, so I can add both to my own pin & badge-laden vest. If you’re interested, act fast – the pre-order is likely to close in the next week or two.

Weekly Werewolf Art: “It’s Back” by Natalie Hall

A. Quinton — Feb. 5th 2018

If you’ve ever looked up werewolf art online, you’ve probably seen Natalie Hall’s art. Her smokey, long-limbed werewolves prowl her Instagram and Tumblr accounts, looking like the last thing you see in a nightmare before you wake up screaming (or possibly die in your sleep). Werewolves aren’t the only creatures she draws, but they show up frequently, often as women contorted or posed with eerie grace in mid-transformation.

This week’s featured werewolf art is one of Natalie’s recent posts on Tumblr. She doesn’t often title her pieces there, generally leaving a comment referencing a mood or event. This one is accompanied by just two words: “It’s back.” This perfectly captures what I love about her art: it’s stark, moody, almost clinical in its composition; but the werewolf itself, while not posed with menace, clearly represents a threat, and is most obviously and absolutely back, whether you wanted it or not.

http://nataliehall.tumblr.com/post/170428760460/its-back

A graduate of Ringling College of Art and Design in Florida, Natalie is a professional illustrator who works at Purple Panther Tattoos in Los Angeles. You can purchase products featuring her art on Society6 and contribute directly to her cash flow (which in turn enables her art flow) on Patreon. If you’d like to contact her directly to ask about visdev, illustration work, or tattoos, you can find details on her site.

Thanks to Werewolf News reader Gerson Corrêa for suggesting Natalie’s art as this week’s feature.

Weekly Werewolf Art: Untitled by Devon Bragg

A. Quinton — Jan. 22nd 2018

This week’s featured artwork is by “freelance Illustrator, Avid dog petter, French Fry muncher and Dr. Pepper addict” Devon Bragg.

This stark depiction of a pierced, struggling, half-transformed werewolf lacks a title through which one might understand Bragg’s exact intent, freeing you, the viewer, to have it represent anything you like: your struggle against a cruel world, the strength to change yourself against all odds, the blood you’ve shed for others, or your modest collection of arrows and spears.

You can find more of Bragg’s phenomenal work on Tumblr, Instagram and Behance.

http://devside-art.tumblr.com/post/166307462441/going-through-a-bit-of-a-rough-patch-but-hey