Category: Artwork & Creative

Frank Bruce’s grim storybook comic “The Marrow Bones”

A. Quinton — Jul. 13th 2017

Pop quiz! Which of the following best describes Frank Bruce’s online, free-to-read comic The Marrow Bones? Find the answer at the bottom of this post!

  1. a lovingly-illustrated storybook for disturbed children
  2. a pitch for an enjoyable episode of Tales from the Crypt or The Outer limits
  3. “a tale of societal expectations and conformity”
  4. a dark little morality tale with a punchline that could be summarized by the last line of Mother Mother’s song “The Stand”
  5. all of the above

I had a lot of fun reading this. It’s a privilege to see someone’s concept expressed with such diligence, craftsmanship and character. The artwork – generally hand-drawn on Bee Paper products with Sakura Micron ink pens and Copic markers,  according to Frank’s site – is mesmerizing, and the story leads down some interesting paths before taking a (maybe kind of expected but still enjoyable) twist.

There’s a ton of captivating art on his site, including a gallery titled “Women & Werewolves” that had me scrolling for a long time. For more of his work you can also follow him on Instagram and Facebook.

Thanks to @EvilViergacht for the link.

Quiz answer: stop reading this and go look at the comic, ya dingus

Welcome to #Julycanthropy

A. Quinton — Jul. 6th 2017

I love a good werewolf-themed event hashtag. I even tried starting one myself, to middling success. (Pro tip: don’t expect your art-related group thing to pop off if you don’t really draw anything yourself). Enter #Julycanthropy, the preferred portmanteau of summertime werewolves everywhere.

Originally coined (as near as I can tell) on Twitter last year by Tiffany Turrill, Julycanthropy is a great excuse to draw werewolves for an entire month. It’s like Inktober with all of those pesky non-lycanthrope prompts removed. Participating artists generally post their daily drawings on Twitter under the #julycanthropy tag, where the rest of us can enjoy the wide variety of thematic interpretations.

Collective, decentralized events like this are awesome because anyone can do whatever they like, but for those wanting a common set of prompts to work from, may I recommend Maria Nynfa‘s list:

The featured image on this post (used with permission) is a work-in-progress shot by Ben G Geldenhuyscheck out the finished piece here.

Best Buy offers exclusive “Wolf Man” SteelBook Blu-ray with cover art by Alex Ross

A. Quinton — Jun. 27th 2017

Via Bloody Disgusting comes the news that Universal (who really seem to be doubling down on their stable of monsters lately) is re-issuing seven of their classic horror films this September. They’ll be sold exclusively through Best Buy as SteelBook Blu-rays, featuring brand-new cover paintings by legendary comic artist Alex Ross. Included on the roster is 1941’s “The Wolf Man”.

So what’s a “SteelBook Blu-ray”? According to the SteelBook site, it’s a cool metal case.

Prized by fans and collectors for its iconic design, luxurious finish and ability to showcase artwork, a SteelBook® edition is a premium metal case that represents the ultimate way to store your favorite movies and games.

Nowhere on the Best Buy site are the specifications of the Blu-ray disc itself given, so it could very well be the same edition of The Wolf Man that’s available for purchase right now, albeit with some lovely new artwork wrapped around it.

I think Ross’s work here might be the best Wolf Man art I’ve seen since Martin Ansin’s print for Mondo, but the delivery format isn’t for me. My DVDs and Blu-rays and VHS cassettes are all slotted sideways on a shelf so that only the spines are visible, and I’m not interested in collecting physical media for films anymore anyway, unless the film itself is something rare or exclusive. In this case I’d rather pay for a print of Ross’s beautiful new art that I can put up on the wall than a 5″ x 7″ copy that’s stuck to the front of a metal box.

If this edition of The Wolf Man catches your fancy, though, you can pre-order it directly from Best Buy for $19.99 right now and it will ship in mid-September.

JD Laclede, the West Coast vibe, and “Ask The Werewolves – Memory”

A. Quinton — Jun. 24th 2017

Having lived near the Pacific Ocean for most of my life, there’s a particular “west coast” vibe that strikes a chord with me whenever I detect it in a story or piece of writing. It’s in the music of Loscil and Tycho, the writing of Douglas Coupland and Kim Stanley Robinson, and as I am increasingly delighted to discover, the work of JD Laclede.

JD writes and draws Ask The Werewolves and he also wrote the outstanding story “Broken Colors” for Werewolves Versus Fascism. He does a lot more than that – see for yourself on his Patreon and at his site – but anything he creates that depicts his vision of California comports especially strongly with my own tough-to-articulate feelings about the land between Alaska and the Baja. There’s love, hope, sweet melancholy, and that distinctly Pacific mashup of glittering new cities and ancient coastal forest.

All of that is encapsulated wonderfully in the animation he posted recently in response to an Ask The Werewolves question. You don’t even need to be familiar with Blackbird (the werewolf depicted), the city of Midnight, CA or the conceit of ATW to get that vibe. I’m grateful that JD and so many other artists, writers and musicians are able to express what I can’t about this place… and I’m particularly thankful that JD can do it with wry humour and werewolves.

WV05 – “Werewolves Versus: Hollywood” call for entries

A. Quinton — Jun. 22nd 2017

Werewolves Versus, the zine I edit, has a new issue coming out this summer, and you could be in it!

Less than a month to go before submission cut-off for WEREWOLVES VERSUS: HOLLYWOOD!

We want comicsillustrationspoems and short stories about werewolves in film, on film, involved in filmmaking, movie criticism, special effects or anything else related to movies. Everyone is welcome!

Your submission doesn’t need to involve Hollywood specifically. For instance, I’m in Vancouver, where many of your favourite shows and films are made. Then there’s the world of indie filmmaking, student films, educational filmstrips…

We’ve been accepting completed original submissions since spring, with a deadline of July 16th 2017. If you’re interested in submitting something, please have a look at the WV termsand submission guidelines.

15 submissions will be selected by the editor (that’s me) and published in the issue. Each accepted submission will be paid 6% of the issue’s net profits through 2023. Go here for more info on compensation.

If you have questions, please ask @werewolves_vs on Twitter.

You can read the four previous issues of Werewolves Versus here for whatever price you like – including free!

Dušan Marković’s “Night Legion” album cover art features amazing werewolves

A. Quinton — Jun. 18th 2017

Serbian artist Dušan Marković recently posted his amazing cover art for Australian power metal band Night Legion‘s debut album. The cover of “Blood Wolf Coven” depicts lead vocalist Vo Simpson leading the rest of the band, who have turned into a squad of incredibly bad-ass werewolves. Below are some detail shots from the Night Legion Facebook page. Click any of them for the full piece on Dušan’s DeviantArt page.

Friend of Werewolf News (and amazing artist in his own right) Viergacht called it “the most epic werewolf metal album cover”, and I agree! These beasts perfectly embody my ideal werewolf aesthetic. That seems to be Dušan’s style – he’s painted at least one other group of werewolves in this style and I think I’m in love.

I wish I could tell you more about Night Legion and Blood Wolf Coven, but their online presence is kind of weird – there’s no release date other than “2017” for the album on their Facebook page or web site, and you can only hear their music in sample videos for the spring tour that just ended. If you’re into melodic power metal, check them out!

Manny Aguilera’s “Bite Me” t-shirt design

A. Quinton — Jun. 8th 2017

Manny Aguilera (mannycartoon on Twitter and Instagram) has designed a new shirt that I have absolutely purchased because I am complete sucker for tank tops with late-80s motifs. Add aviators to a snarling werewolf and my credit card magically appears on the desk. If you get one of these shirts (or any other product with this design on it) by end-of-day Friday, you’ll get an automatic discount, too!

I wanted to design something fun with bold colors. I grew up in the 80s and 90s and I still remember all those bold Ocean Pacific t-shirts and the cool tees my skater buddies used to wear. This design is a take off on that, and a little tribute to #werewolfwednesday and the culture that spawned it. I grew up obsessed with werewolves (Scott Howard is the man) so I wanted to create something 10-year-old me would lose his mind over.

Rick Baker resurrects the amazing werewolf mask he “let George use” in Star Wars

A. Quinton — May. 25th 2017

The Star Wars werewolf connection hinges entirely on special effects legend Rick Baker deciding to use some of his off-the-shelf creature masks during re-shoots of the Episode IV cantina scene in 1977. Among those masks was a werewolf Baker had created on his own in 1973. As with seemingly everyone else in that cantina, the werewolf extra gained an official name – Lak Sivrak – and an elaborate backstory full of intrigue, romance, tragedy, sacrifice, most of which was told through Star Wars comic books.

Then in 2012, Disney consigned everything about the character except his name and species to Legends, the phantom zone for all retroactively non-canonical Star Wars artifacts. And that was it for poor Lak until earlier this week, when Baker set about re-casting a new mask from that original 1973 mold.

He posted four photos of his work – which I’ve embedded below – on his Instagram feed. The quality of his design and work is astonishing, and consider that he did all of this in three days.

The hashtags and reminiscences in Baker’s comments make this seem like an observance of the film’s release anniversary – Star Wars hit theatres 40 years ago today –but it could also be a coincidence. Baker seems like the kind of person who’d resurrect a 43-year-old mold and then and pour, pull, paint, hair and trim a new mask on a lark – simply because he loves doing this sort of thing (and happens to be really, really, really fucking good at it).

“Reverend Lowe” – a “Cycle of the Werewolf” print by Steve Mardo

A. Quinton — May. 8th 2017

More werewolf art for your walls! Gallery 1988 hosting a Stephen King art tribute, featuring dozens of exhibits inspired by the horror author’s works. Here’s the one werewolf-related piece I spotted: “Reverend Lowe” by Steve Mardo. The framed original has sold, but you can still get one of the 20 signed prints for yourself.

digital print
11 x 14 inches
signed and numbered, limited edition of 20

inspired by Cycle of the Werewolf

If you’re in Los Angeles you can see the exhibit in person through May 27th at GALLERY1988, 7308 Melrose Ave.

Get Matt Ryan’s Mondo “American Werewolf in London” poster today if you’re in Texas, or online later if you’re not

A. Quinton — May. 5th 2017

Mondo’s got this thing where they commission great artists to make incredible posters, then sell 95% of the stock at an event in Texas and let those of us elsewhere (say, Vancouver) fight for the remaining 5% online.

Well, they did it again, commissioning Canadian artist Matt Ryan to create the lycanthropic entry in “a line-up of awesome new horror posters”. Writes Matt:

There hasn’t been many “alternative” posters created for An American Werewolf in London. I think that was what initially drew me in wanting to create something for it for the Mondo fam. I’m usually drawn towards posters that dont have too many pre-existing pieces of print work under their belt. It means the subject matter hasnt been played out and/or over saturated.

I love the look of the Shaftesbury Memorial Fountain and wanted to subtly illustrate the famous Rick Baker Werewolf into the fountain itself, so at first glance perhaps you dont even see it. Just some ornate aspect to the fountain. Originally my idea was to keep the wolf even more hideen and smaller in scale, then I hit the “fuck it” button. I also wanted the poster to sort of trick the eye into almost thinking its an 1800’s period piece in its look and rendering of the fountain but then have the glow of tacky retro neon signage…dating it firmly in the 80’s.

Pictured below is the “regular” edition. Visit Matt’s site to see the Glow In the Dark variant, featuring “a more reto, sun-bleached-black-brown color palette”.

Your best shot at getting one of these 24″ x 36″ beauties is to attend Texas Frightmare Weekend, starting pretty much right this instant and running through Sunday the 7th – Mondo will be selling these and other horror posters at booths 160-162. If you’re not in the Dallas–Fort Worth area this weekend, keep an eye on the Mondo web site poster collection, which is where any extras will pop up.

Thanks to Craig J. Clark for the link.

Edit: I just saw Matt did this frankly gorgeous Silver Bullet screen print (with metallic inks!) as a private commission. This exists somewhere in the world and it’s impossible to obtain without some combination of graft and teleportation. Fuck.